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Day of Pentecost
 
Proper 4 (Note used in 2011)
Proper 8 (Next Sunday in 2011)
Quotes - Your Comments - Hymns - Sermons, Commentaries & Outlines - Readings for this Week
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Unless Jesus returns before:
June 19, 2011
Father's Day & Peace with Justice Sunday

Our Mission

"Go ye therefore, and teach all nations,
baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.- Matthew 28:19


Readings  

Common

Catholic

Episcopal

First Reading Genesis 1:1-2:4a Exodus 34:4-6, 8-9  Genesis 1:1-2:3
Second Reading 2 Corinthians 13:11-13 2 Corinthians 13:11-13 2 Corinthians 13:(5-10)11-14
Psalm 8:1-9 Daniel 3:52, 53, 54, 55, 56 150
Gospel Matthew 28:16-20 John 3:16-18 Matthew 28:16-20

 

Quotes & Notes on:     Matthew 28:19   

  • John Wesley's Notes:
     
    Disciple all nations-Make them my disciples. This includes the whole design of Christ's commission. Baptizing and teaching are the two great branches of that general design. And these were to be determined by the circumstances of things; which made it necessary in baptizing adult Jews or heathens, to teach them before they were baptized; in discipling their children, to baptize them before they were taught; as the Jewish children in all ages were first circumcised, and after taught to do all God had commanded them. Mr 16:15.
     

  • Treasury of Scripture Knowledge:

    * ye therefore. Ps 22:27; 98:2,3; Isa 42:1-4; 49:6; 52:10; 66:18,19; Mr 16:15,16 Lu 24:47,48; Ac 1:8; 13:46; 28:28; Ro 10:18; Col 1:23
    * teach all nations. or, make disciples, or Christians, of all
    nations. baptizing. Ac 2:38,39; 8:12-16,36-38; 9:18; 10:47; 16:15-33; 19:3-5 1Co 1:13-16; 15:29; 1Pe 3:21
    * the name. Mt 3:16,17; Ge 1:26; Nu 6:24-27; Isa 48:16; 1Co 12:4-6; 2Co 13:14 Eph 2:18; 1Jo 5:7; Re 1:4-6
     

  • Adam Clarke's Commentary:

    Go ye therefore] Because I have the authority aforesaid, and can send whomsoever I will to do whatsoever I please:-teach, , make disciples of all nations, bring them to an acquaintance with God who bought them, and then baptize them in the name of the Father. It is natural to suppose that adults were the first subjects of baptism; for as the Gospel was, in a peculiar manner, sent to the Gentiles, they must hear and receive it, before they could be expected to renounce their old prejudices and idolatries, and come into the bonds of the Christian covenant. But, certainly, no argument can be drawn from this concession against the baptism of children. When the Gentiles and Jews had received the faith and blessings of the Gospel, it is natural enough to suppose they should wish to get their children incorporated with the visible Church of Christ; especially if, as many pious and learned men have believed, baptism succeeded to circumcision, which I think has never yet been disproved. The apostles knew well that the Jews not only circumcised the children of proselytes, but also baptized them; and as they now received a commission to teach and proselyte all the nations, and baptize them in the name of the holy Trinity, they must necessarily understand that infants were included: nor could they, the custom of their country being considered, have understood our Lord differently, unless he had, in the most express terms, said that they were not to baptize children, which neither he nor his apostles ever did. And as to the objection, that the baptized were obliged to profess their faith, and that, therefore, only adults should be baptized, there is no weight at all in it; because what is spoken of such refers to those who, only at that period of life, heard the Gospel, and were not born of parents who had been Christians; therefore they could not have been baptized into the Christian faith, forasmuch as no such faith was at their infancy preached in the world. That the children and even infants, of proselytes, were baptized among the Jews, and reputed, in consequence, clean, and partakers of the blessings of the covenant, see proved at large by Wetstein, in his note on Mt 3:16. See ACC for Mt 3:6, and particularly see ACC for Mr 16:16.

    In the name of the Father, &c.] Baptism, properly speaking, whether administered by dipping or sprinkling, signifies a full and eternal consecration of the person to the service and honour of that Being in whose name it is administered; but this consecration can never be made to a creature; therefore the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, are not creatures. Again, baptism is not made in the name of a quality or attribute of the Divine nature; therefore the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, are not qualities or attributes of the Divine nature. The orthodox, as they are termed, have generally considered this text as a decisive proof of the doctrine of the holy Trinity: and what else can they draw from it? Is it possible for words to convey a plainer sense than these do? And do they not direct every reader to consider the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, as three distinct persons? "But this I can never believe." I cannot help that-you shall not be persecuted by me for differing from my opinion. I cannot go over to you; I must abide by what I believe to be the meaning of the Scriptures. Dr. Lightfoot has some good thoughts on this commission given to the apostles:-

    "I. Christ commands them to go and baptize the nations: but how much time was past before such a journey was taken! And when the time was now come that this work should be begun, Peter doth not enter upon it without a previous admonition given him from heaven. And this was occasioned hereby, that, according to the command of Christ, the Gospel was first to be preached to Judea, Samaria, and Galilee.

    "II. He commands them to baptize in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost; but among the Jews, they baptized only in the name of Jesus. See Ac 2:38; 8:16; 19:5. For this reason, that thus the baptizers might assert, and the baptized confess, Jesus to be the true Messias; which was chiefly controverted by the Jews. Of the same nature is that apostolic blessing, Grace and peace from God the Father, and from our Lord Jesus Christ. Where then is the Holy Ghost? He is not excluded, however he be not named. The Jews did more easily consent to the Spirit of the Messias, which they very much celebrate, than to the person of the Messias. Above all others they deny and abjure Jesus of Nazareth. It belonged to the apostles, therefore, the more earnestly to assert Jesus (to be the Messias) by how much the more vehemently they opposed him: which being once cleared, the acknowledging of the Spirit of Christ would be introduced without delay or scruple. Moses, (in Ex 6:14,) going about to reckon up all the tribes of Israel, goes no farther than the tribe of Levi; and takes up with that to which his business and story at that present related. In like manner, the apostles, for the present, baptize in the name of Jesus, and bless in the name of the Father and of Jesus, that thereby they might more firmly establish the doctrine of Jesus, which met with such sharp and virulent opposition; which doctrine being established among them, they would soon agree about the Holy Ghost.

    "III. Among the Jews, the controversy was about the true Messias; among the Gentiles, about the true God. It was therefore proper among the Jews to baptize in the name of Jesus, that he might be vindicated to be the true Messias. Among the Gentiles, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, that they might be hereby instructed in the doctrine of the true God.-Let this be particularly noted.

    "IV. The Jews baptized proselytes into the name of the Father, that is, into the profession of God, whom they called by the name of Father. The apostles baptize the Jews into the name of Jesus the Son, and the Gentiles, into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.

    "V. The Father hath revealed himself in the old covenant; the Son in the new; in human flesh by his miracles, doctrine, resurrection and ascension; the Holy Ghost in his gifts and miracles. Thus the doctrine of the ever blessed Trinity grew by degrees to full maturity. For the arriving to the acknowledgment of which, it was incumbent upon all who professed the true God to be three in one to be baptized into his name." LIGHTFOOT'S Works, vol. ii. p. 274.
     

  • Family Bible Notes:

     Teach; disciple all nations; proclaim to them the gospel, for the purpose of persuading them to become my disciples. The Father--the Son, and--the Holy Ghost; the one only living and true God. The making of all nations the disciples of Christ should be the great object of all. Some should labor for it in one way, and some in another, as the Lord shall call them. But all should strive together that the Scriptures may be translated into every tongue, and the gospel be preached to every creature.
     

  • 1599 Geneva Bible Notes:
     The sum of the apostleship is the proclaiming of the doctrine received from Christ throughout all the world, and the ministering of the sacraments: the efficacy of which things depends not on the minsters but on the Lord. (f) Calling upon the Name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
     

  • People's New Testament Commentary:

     Go ye therefore, and make disciples of all nations. There are several things to be noticed: (1) Go, implies an aggressive warfare. The Gospel army must move upon the nations. The Lord seeks universal empire, and sends forth his armies to conquer the world. Every church and every disciple must understand that they have marching orders. (2) Not only is every saint commanded to go, or to take steps to make the gospel go, but the object is stated. They are to make disciples, or pupils, and scholars of Christ; not great philosophers, but "babes in Christ Jesus" [1Co 3:1], who have entered the school of Christ and are to be taught afterwards. (3) Who are to be made disciples is next indicated. Not the Jews only, but all nations. Christ came to be the Savior of the world. His is a universal religion. In the Great Commission he looks beyond Judea, and commands that the Gospel shall be offered to all nations. The test of eighteen centuries shows that Christianity is not local or national, but is adapted to the needs of all mankind. (4) It is next stated how disciples shall be made.

    Baptizing them. The rite by which those who believe upon him should be formally enlisted and enrolled in the school of Christ is baptism. It is not a baptism of the Spirit that he means, because it is one that those whom he addresses are commanded to administer. He alone baptized with the Spirit; his apostles and disciples baptized in water, and it is to this rite that he refers. Hence, when we turn to the preaching of the apostles under this commission, we find that all converts were at once baptized (Ac 2:38-41; 8:12-18). (5) The end or result of baptism is also given. Converts were to be baptized into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. It is a positive affirmation of the Old Testament that where the name of the Lord is recorded there will he meet his disciples, or there will be his presence. See Ex 20:24. The Lord declares that the three names, that of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, are recorded in baptism. In this rite, then, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit meet the believer; the Father to receive him as a child, the Son to welcome him as a brother, and to cover him with the mantle of his own purity; the Holy Spirit to endow him with that Spirit by which he can say, "Abba, Father." "Into the name of" is equivalent to "into the presence of," or "into the Father, and into the Son, and into the Holy Spirit."
     

  • Robertson's Word Pictures:
     All the nations (panta ta ethnę). Not just the Jews scattered among the Gentiles, but the Gentiles themselves in every land. And not by making Jews of them, though this point is not made plain here. It will take time for the disciples to grow into this Magna Charta of the missionary propaganda. But here is the world program of the Risen Christ and it should not be forgotten by those who seek to foreshorten it all by saying that Jesus expected his second coming to be very soon, even within the lifetime of those who heard. He did promise to come, but he has never named the date. Meanwhile we are to be ready for his coming at any time and to look for it joyfully. But we are to leave that to the Father and push on the campaign for world conquest. This program includes making disciples or learners (mathęteusate) such as they were themselves. That means evangelism in the fullest sense and not merely revival meetings. Baptism in (eis, not into) the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, in the name of the Trinity. Objection is raised to this language in the mouth of Jesus as too theological and as not a genuine part of the Gospel of Matthew for the same reason. See Mt 11:27, where Jesus speaks of the Father and the Son as here. But it is all to no purpose. There is a chapter devoted to this subject in my The Christ of the Logia in which the genuineness of these words is proven. The name of Jesus is the essential part of it as is shown in the Acts. Trine immersion is not taught as the Greek Church holds and practices, baptism in the name of the Father, then of the Son, then of the Holy Spirit. The use of name (onoma) here is a common one in the Septuagint and the papyri for power or authority. For the use of eis with onoma in the sense here employed, not meaning into, see Mt 10:41ff. (cf. also Mt 12:41).
     

  • Albert Barnes' Commentary:

       Go ye therefore. Because all power is mine, go. I can defend you. The world is placed under my control. It is redeemed. It is given me in promise by my Father, as the purchase of my death. Though you are weak, yet I am strong. Though you will encounter many troubles and dangers, yet I can defend you. Though you die, yet I live, and the work shall be accomplished.

    Teach all nations. The word rendered teach, here, is not the one that is usually so translated in the New Testament. This word properly means disciple, or make disciples of, all nations. This was to be done, however, by teaching them, and by administering the rite of baptism. All nations. The gracious commission was the foundation of the authority to go to the Gentiles. The Jews had expected that the offers of life, under the Messiah, would be confined to their own nation. Jesus broke down the partition wall, and commissioned his disciples to go everywhere, and bring the world to the knowledge of himself.

    Baptizing them. Applying to them water, as an emblem of the purifying influences of the Christian religion through the Holy Spirit, and solemnly devoting them to God.

    In the name, etc. This phrase does not mean, here, by the authority of the Father, etc. To be baptized in the name of the Father, etc., is the same as to be baptized unto the Father; as to believe on the name of Christ is the same as to believe on Christ. Joh 1:12; 2:23; 3:18; 1Co 1:13. To be baptized unto anyone is publicly to receive and adopt him as a religious teacher or lawgiver; to receive his system of religion. Thus the Jews were baptized "unto Moses" 1Co 10:2. That is, they received the system that he taught; they acknowledged him as their lawgiver and teacher. So Paul asks, (1Co 1:13) "Were ye baptized in the name of Paul?" --i.e., Were you devoted to Paul by this rite? Did you bind yourselves to him, and give yourselves away to him, or to God? So to be baptized in the name of the Father, etc., means publicly, by a significant rite, to receive the system of religion, to bind the soul to obey his laws; to be devoted to him; to receive, as the guide and comforter of the life, his system of religion; to obey his laws, and trust to his promises. To be baptized unto the Son, in like manner, is to receive him as the Messiah--our Prophet, Priest, and King; to submit to his laws, and to receive him as the Saviour of the soul. To be baptized unto the Holy Ghost is to receive him publicly as the Sanctifier, Comforter, and Guide of the soul. The meaning, then, may be thus expressed: Baptizing them unto the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, by a solemn profession of the only true religion, and by a solemn devotion to the service of the sacred Trinity.

    The union of these three names in the form of baptism proves that the Son and Holy Ghost are equal with the Father. Nothing would be more absurd or blasphemous than to unite the name of a creature --a man or an angel--with the name of the ever-living God, in this solemn rite. If Jesus was a mere man or an angel, as is held by many who deny his Divinity; and if the Holy Ghost was a mere attribute of God; then it would have been the height of absurdity to use a form like this, or to direct the apostles to baptize men unto them. How absurd would be the direction--nay, now blasphemous to have said, "Baptize them unto God, and unto Paul, and unto the wisdom or power of God!" Can we believe that our Saviour would have given a direction so absurd as this? Yet, unless he himself was Divine, and the Holy Spirit was Divine, Jesus gave a direction substantially the same as this. The form of baptism, therefore, has been always understood as an irrefragable argument for the doctrine of the Trinity, or that the Son and Holy Spirit are equal with the Father.

    {r} "Go ye" Mr 16:15
    {1} "teach" or, "make disciples", or "Christians" of all nations
    {s} "all nations" Isa 52:10; Ro 10:18
     

  • Jamieson-Faussett Brown:

    Go ye therefore, and teach all nations--rather, "make disciples of all nations"; for "teaching," in the more usual sense of that word, comes in afterwards, and is expressed by a different term.

    baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost--It should be, "into the name"; as in 1Co 10:2, "And were all baptized unto (or rather 'into') Moses"; and Ga 3:27, "For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ."
     

  • Spurgeon Devotional Commentary:

    (No comment on this verse).

     

  • Spurgeon Commentary on Matthew:
    (No comment on this verse).

     

  • William Burkitt's Notes:

    (No comment on this verse).
     

  • Matthew Henry's  Commentary:

      (No comment on this verse).

     

  • Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary:

     (No comment on this verse).
     

  • The Fourfold Gospel:

  •       Therefore. The first word of the commission is significant, and should be remembered. We have no right to wait for sinners to come and hear the gospel; we must carry it to them. See TFG for Mt 10:6. The "therefore" with which it opens shows that Jesus rests his command on his divine authority. See TFG for Mt 28:18).

    And make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them. The structure of the sentence in the original Greek shows that it is the disciples and not the nations who are to be baptized; according to the commission, therefore, one must be made a disciple before he can be baptized. See TFG for Mr 16:16.

More Quotes
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  •  
    • Part III -- THE MINISTRY OF ALL CHRISTIANS:  THE MISSION AND MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH
      Section I. The Churches
      • ¶ 120. The Mission
        • The mission of the Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ. Local churches provide the most significant arena through which disciple-making occurs.
      • ¶ 121. Rationale for Our Mission
        • The mission of the Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ by proclaiming the good news of God's grace and by exemplifying Jesus' command to love God and neighbor, thus seeking the fulfillment of God's reign and realm in the world. The fulfillment of God's reign and realm in the world is the vision Scripture holds before us. The United Methodist Church affirms that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, the Savior of the world, and the Lord of all. As we make disciples, we respect persons of all religious faiths and we defend religious freedom for all persons. Jesus' words in Matthew provide the Church with our mission: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you” (28:19-20), and “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. . . . And you shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (22:37, 39).
          This mission is our grace-filled response to the Reign of God in the world announced by Jesus. God's grace is active everywhere, at all times, carrying out this purpose as revealed in the Bible. It is expressed in God's covenant with Abraham and Sarah, in the Exodus of Israel from Egypt, and in the ministry of the prophets. It is fully embodied in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is experienced in the ongoing creation of a new people by the Holy Spirit.
          John Wesley, Phillip Otterbein, Jacob Albright, and our other spiritual forebears understood this mission in this way. Whenever United Methodism has had a clear sense of mission, God has used our Church to save persons, heal relationships, transform social structures, and spread scriptural holiness, thereby changing the world. In order to be truly alive, we embrace Jesus' mandate to love God and to love our neighbor and to make disciples of all peoples.
      • ¶ 122. The Process for Carrying Out Our Mission
        • We make disciples as we:
          —proclaim the gospel, seek, welcome and gather persons into the body of Christ;
          —lead persons to commit their lives to God through baptism by water and the spirit and profession of faith in Jesus Christ;
          —nurture persons in Christian living through worship, the sacraments, spiritual disciplines, and other means of grace, such as Wesley's Christian conferencing;
          —send persons into the world to live lovingly and justly as servants of Christ by healing the sick, feeding the hungry, caring for the stranger, freeing the oppressed, being and becoming a compassionate, caring presence, and working to develop social structures that are consistent with the gospel; and
          —continue the mission of seeking, welcoming and gathering persons into the community of the body of Christ.
           from the Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church,  Mission Statement of the Church
           

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    Hymns
    Bob VanWyk, Lectionary Hymn Reviewer
     

  • Go Ye Therefore  
  • Freely Freely  
  • Freely, Freely  
  • Father, I Adore You   Jesus, I Adore... Spirit I Adore You by Terrye Coelho
  • God is One, Unique and Holy   Words by Brian Wren (1983). In Presbyterian "Hymna: and elsewhere
  • Creating God, Your Fingers Trace   Words by Jeffery Rowthorn (1979). Various tunes. In Prsbyterian "Hymnal" and "With One Voice" (Lutheran), and elsewhere.
  • Come, All You People   By a hymn writer from Zimbabwe. In "With One Voice" (Lutheran). I don't know where else.
  • Lord, Our lord, Thy Glorious Name   A version of Psalm 8.
  • O Lord, Our God, How Excellent   A version of Psalm 8
  • Holy, Holy   Words and music by Jimmy Owens (1972).
  • Sovereign Lord of All Creation   Words by steward Cross (11928-1989). The music is the faiirly familiar tune, "Geneva."
  • All Glory Be to God on High    Words and music by Nikolaus Decius (1522).
  • Holy, Holy, Holy
  • Come Thou Almighty King
  • Take the Name of Jesus With You
  • Rescue the Perishing
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    Sermons, Outlines, & Commentaries
    Lanora Wright, Lectionary Topic Librarian

    See also:  220.7 - Bible Commentaries; 251 - Homiletics252 - Sermon Texts

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    Trinitarian Quotes

    Nicene Creed - UMC Discipline & Resolutions - Catholic Catechism

    The Nicene Creed

    We believe in one God,  the Father, the Almighty,  maker of heaven and earth,  of all that is, seen and unseen.We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,  the only Son of God,  eternally begotten of the Father,  God from God, Light from Light,  true God from true God,  begotten, not made,  of one Being with the Father.  Through him all things were made.  For us and for our salvation    he came down from heaven:  by the power of the Holy Spirit    he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary,    and was made man.  For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate;    he suffered death and was buried.    On the third day he rose again      in accordance with the Scriptures;    he ascended into heaven      and is seated at the right hand of the Father.  He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead,    and his kingdom will have no end.We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,  who proceeds from the Father and the Son.  With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.  He has spoken through the Prophets.  We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.  We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.  We look for the resurrection of the dead,    and the life of the world to come.  Amen.

     

    • From the Book of Discipline of the United Methodist Church, Part III, THE MINISTRY OF ALL CHRISTIANS:  THE MISSION AND MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH
      Section I. The Churches
      ¶ 120. The Mission
      The mission of the Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ. Local churches provide the most significant arena through which disciple-making occurs.
      ¶ 121. Rationale for Our Mission
      The mission of the Church is to make disciples of Jesus Christ by proclaiming the good news of God's grace and by exemplifying Jesus' command to love God and neighbor, thus seeking the fulfillment of God's reign and realm in the world. The fulfillment of God's reign and realm in the world is the vision Scripture holds before us. The United Methodist Church affirms that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, the Savior of the world, and the Lord of all. As we make disciples, we respect persons of all religious faiths and we defend religious freedom for all persons. Jesus' words in Matthew provide the Church with our mission: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you” (28:19-20), and “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. . . . And you shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (22:37, 39).
      This mission is our grace-filled response to the Reign of God in the world announced by Jesus. God's grace is active everywhere, at all times, carrying out this purpose as revealed in the Bible. It is expressed in God's covenant with Abraham and Sarah, in the Exodus of Israel from Egypt, and in the ministry of the prophets. It is fully embodied in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is experienced in the ongoing creation of a new people by the Holy Spirit.
      John Wesley, Phillip Otterbein, Jacob Albright, and our other spiritual forebears understood this mission in this way. Whenever United Methodism has had a clear sense of mission, God has used our Church to save persons, heal relationships, transform social structures, and spread scriptural holiness, thereby changing the world. In order to be truly alive, we embrace Jesus' mandate to love God and to love our neighbor and to make disciples of all peoples.
      ¶ 122. The Process for Carrying Out Our Mission
      We make disciples as we:
      —proclaim the gospel, seek, welcome and gather persons into the body of Christ;
      —lead persons to commit their lives to God through baptism by water and the spirit and profession of faith in Jesus Christ;
      —nurture persons in Christian living through worship, the sacraments, spiritual disciplines, and other means of grace, such as Wesley's Christian conferencing;
      —send persons into the world to live lovingly and justly as servants of Christ by healing the sick, feeding the hungry, caring for the stranger, freeing the oppressed, being and becoming a compassionate, caring presence, and working to develop social structures that are consistent with the gospel; and
      —continue the mission of seeking, welcoming and gathering persons into the community of the body of Christ.
      from the Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church ,  Mission Statement of the Church

      From the Book of Discipline of the United Methodist Church ¶ 103. SECTION 3—OUR DOCTRINAL STANDARDS AND GENERAL RULES

      • Article I—Of Faith in the Holy Trinity
        There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body or parts, of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the maker and preserver of all things, both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there are three persons, of one substance, power, and eternity—the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. (from Articles of Religion of the [former] Methodist Church)

      • Article I—God
        We believe in the one true, holy and living God, Eternal Spirit, who is Creator, Sovereign and Preserver of all things visible and invisible. He is infinite in power, wisdom, justice, goodness and love, and rules with gracious regard for the well-being and salvation of men, to the glory of his name. We believe the one God reveals himself as the Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit, distinct but inseparable, eternally one in essence and power.  (from Confession of Faith of the [former] Evangelical United Brethren Church)

    • From the Book of Resolutions of the United Methodist Church, This Holy Mystery: A United Methodist Understanding of Holy Communion, Part Two: Christ Is Here: Experiencing the Mystery

      • The Prayer of Great Thanksgiving
        Principle:
            The prayer of Great Thanksgiving is addressed to God, is prayed by the whole people, and is led by the presiding minister. The prayer is shaped by our Trinitarian understanding of the nature of God. It includes an introductory dialogue, thankful remembrance of God's mighty acts of creation and the salvation made possible through Jesus Christ, the institution of the Lord's Supper, invoking of the present work of the Holy Spirit, and concluding praise to the Trinity. The prayer recognizes the fullness of God's triune nature, expresses the offering of ourselves in response, and looks toward the joy of sharing in God's eventual victory over sin and death.
        Background:
            The Trinitarian structure is evident in the Great Thanksgiving in the Word and Table services of The United Methodist Hymnal (pages 6-16). Following the introductory exchange between presiding minister and people in the Great Thanksgiving, prayer is addressed to "Father [God] Almighty, creator of heaven and earth." Following the Sanctus ("Holy, holy, holy . . ." ), the work of the second person of the Trinity is proclaimed: ". . . and blessed is your Son [Child] Jesus Christ." The presence and work of the Holy Spirit are invoked in the portion beginning "Pour out your Holy Spirit on us gathered here and on these gifts . . . ," words historically known as the epiclesis. Throughout the Great Thanksgiving the congregation prays actively but silently and speaks its responses aloud at designated points in the service.
            In their Hymns on the Lord's Supper, John and Charles Wesley make clear that divine presence and power come into the Eucharistic experience through the action of the Holy Spirit. Hymn 72 in that collection is a good example:

        Come, Holy Ghost, Thine influence shed,
        And realize [make real] the sign;
        Thy life infuse into the bread,
        Thy power into the wine.
        Effectual let the tokens prove,
        And made, by heavenly art,
        Fit channels to convey Thy love
        To every faithful heart.
         

    • From the Catechism of the Catholic Church
      PART 1, SECTION 2 2, CHAPTER 1 1, ARTICLE 1, PARAGRAPH 2, SUBSECTION 1

      I. "IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER AND OF THE SON AND OF THE HOLY SPIRIT"


      232 Christians are baptized "in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit" 53 Before receiving the sacrament, they respond to a three-part question when asked to confess the Father, the Son and the Spirit: "I do." "The faith of all Christians rests on the Trinity." 54
      233 Christians are baptized in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit: not in their names, 55 for there is only one God, the almighty Father, his only Son and the Holy Spirit: the Most Holy Trinity.

      234 The mystery of the Most Holy Trinity is the central mystery of Christian faith and life. It is the mystery of God in himself. It is therefore the source of all the other mysteries of faith, the light that enlightens them. It is the most fundamental and essential teaching in the "hierarchy of the truths of faith". 56 The whole history of salvation is identical with the history of the way and the means by which the one true God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, reveals himself to men "and reconciles and unites with himself those who turn away from sin". 57

      235 This paragraph expounds briefly (I) how the mystery of the Blessed Trinity was revealed, (II) how the Church has articulated the doctrine of the faith regarding this mystery, and (III) how, by the divine missions of the Son and the Holy Spirit, God the Father fulfils the "plan of his loving goodness" of creation, redemption and sanctification.

      236 The Fathers of the Church distinguish between theology (theologia) and economy (oikonomia). "Theology" refers to the mystery of God's inmost life within the Blessed Trinity and "economy" to all the works by which God reveals himself and communicates his life. Through the oikonomia the theologia is revealed to us; but conversely, the theologia illuminates the whole oikonomia. God's works reveal who he is in himself; the mystery of his inmost being enlightens our understanding of all his works. So it is, analogously, among human persons. A person discloses himself in his actions, and the better we know a person, the better we understand his actions.

      237 The Trinity is a mystery of faith in the strict sense, one of the "mysteries that are hidden in God, which can never be known unless they are revealed by God". 58 To be sure, God has left traces of his Trinitarian being in his work of creation and in his Revelation throughout the Old Testament. But his inmost Being as Holy Trinity is a mystery that is inaccessible to reason alone or even to Israel's faith before the Incarnation of God's Son and the sending of the Holy Spirit.

       



     

     

     

     


     

     

     


     
     

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